Camping Gear Guide
Down Sleeping Bags

The North Face Furnace Sleeping Bag: 35 Degree Down


Product Details

The North Face Furnace 35-Degree Down Sleeping Bag offers toasty warmth for cool summer nights, water-resistant protection for variable weather and high-humidity environments, and roomy comfort when sleeping space is more important to you than a few ounces of weight savings. The Furnace's 550-fill goose down is water-resistant for reliable performance when conditions aren't perfectly dry, and the water-repellent outer fabric and lining protect both you and the bag from heat-robbing moisture. Strategically placed synthetic insulation pads underneath you (made of 30% recycled material) add an extra layer of protection between you and the cold ground, and a draft collar helps keep your body warmth in and the cool night air out. The insulation is evenly distributed from top to bottom so you don't get uncomfortable cold spots when you're moving around in the sleeping bag. The Furnace's relaxed mummy shape allows the bag to stay more thermally efficient than a rectangular sleeping bag while offering more room to move than ultralight mummy bags with more aggressive tapering. The fitted hood with a drawcord keeps the area around your head warm, and a vaulted foot box offers roomy vertical space for your feet. The bag is outfitted with a convenient, non-snagging two-way zipper (nice if you prefer some fresh air around your feet on warmer nights), and the zipper pull glows in the dark to make unzipping in the middle of the night or before dawn less of a hassle. The highly compressible Furnace packs down into a 8x13-inch size for fitting inside your backpack, and its down insulation lofts back up when you take it out for optimal warmth, again and again.

Price : $ 168.95


The North Face Furnace Sleeping Bag: 35 Degree Down Loading...

Lightweight Sleeping Bags Checklist

Sure It's Warm Enough? Lightweight bags are meant for use in weather between 30-50 degrees. But, remember, it's always prudent to add on at least 10 degrees to the bags rating. Thus, a bag rated to 40 degrees might only keep you warm in 50 degree weather.
Down or Synthetic? Each have their advantages. Down is less bulky and weighs a few ounces less. Synthetic costs less (usually) and is easier to dry - you can just toss it in the dryer.
Don't Forget the Sleeping Pad! A sleeping bag is useless without a sleeping pad. So, if you don't already have a sleeping pad, get one. For lightweight sleeping bags (thus used in warm weather), you don't need a super thick or winter-style one.
Ideal Uses for a Lightweight Bag. Where you know...for sure...that the temperature will stay at least 10-15 degrees above the sleeping bags rating. And, where every ounce and cubic inch of space is at a premium. Lightweight bags are often used by climbers and bike campers/travelers. For backpacking in the mountains, a lightweight bag is NOT recommended!

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