Camping Gear Guide
Backpacking Tents

MSR Hubba NX Tent 1-Person 3-Season


Product Details

The MSR Hubba NX 1-Person 3-Season Tent makes it easy to escape the daily grind without having to coordinate schedules or sacrifice valuable time on the trail to the whims of others. A The weight, a mere 2lb 7oz when you've got it all, keeps this tent super-light in your pack. Multiple mesh windows and an innovative fly design give this tent better cross-ventilation than your permanent residence. Unique use of materials helps minimize the weight since you're not sharing the load with a backpacking pal. The bathtub floor uses strong but light 30D ripstop nylon to stand guard against intrusive rocks or tricky twigs. The combination of DWR and 3000mm Durashield polyurethane coating resists entreaties by incoming water so you and your sleeping bag stay dry from the bottom up. A clever blend of mesh and ripstop nylon lets fresh air flow through the body of the tent while giving you the privacy for a full-body tick check. The nylon ripstop rainfly is bathed in a 1200mm Durashield polyurethane and silicone coating to save you from a night of steady showers. New to the Hubba NX this year is a vestibule with a side-zip opening. By moving the zipper from the center of the vestibule to the side, you now have a protected entrance to your on-the-go home. A rain gutter channels water away from the zipper and the entrance to prevent drips from turning into sleeping-pad-soaking puddles. You can roll up the bottom edge of the vestibule, guy it out, and enjoy an evening breeze free of bugs or rain--all while still being able to get in and out of the tent without requiring acrobatic maneuvering. Be it a lone foray into the high country for a weekend free of horns and sirens or a group hike with your trail maintenance club, enjoy sweet dreams in this lightweight, single-sleeper tent.

Price : $ 349.95


MSR Hubba NX Tent 1-Person 3-Season Loading...

Backpacking Tents Checklist

Weight Matters! For two people, any backpacking tent should weigh less than six-pounds...preferably less.
Don't Forget the Bulk. Packing a bulky tent sucks. Make sure it packs down tightly, ideally packing down to about 10x20 inches (smaller is better).
Mesh Matters. As a general rule, the more mesh, the lighter the tent. For warmer three-season use, usually, the more mesh you have, the better. Not only does the mesh save weight, but also allows for better air-flow.
Vestibules & The Rain. An often forget detail about backpacking tents are the vestibule. The vestibule provides a little canopy in front of your tent. Not needed during good weather, but absolutely needed during wet weather. Try to get one that is about 5 sq. feet large, or larger.
Speaking of Rain... Make sure the entire floor of the tent is waterproof. Most are, but if the tent says the floor is just "water resistant"...don't buy it! You'll regret it the first time your sleeping in it during the rain.
Remember the Footprint! Virtually all good backpacking tents also come with "footprints," which are essentially waterproof and tough tarps cut-out in the shape of the tent. Buy It! Not only does it enhance the tent's waterproofing, it also protects the bottom of the tent. Yes, they aren't cheap. But they are a lot cheaper than replacing the tent due to a sharp stick tearing a hole in the floor of your expensive backpacking tent!

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